Organic Horticulture Tips That Will Help You Get A Better Garden!

The more you get into it, the more you may realize that organic horticulture can be a little on the complicated side. You will need to research techniques for chemical-free pest control and healthy ways to make sure your plants continue to thrive. However, growing organic food can be difficult for those who have not done it before. Keep reading to find out how the professionals do it.

Learn how to properly lay sod. Before laying the sod, have your soil prepared. Be sure to get rid of any weeds, and then proceed to break up the soil to get it ready to use. Compact the soil gently but firmly to be certain that it is indeed flat. Dampen the soil completely. Lay the sod down in alternated rows, keeping the joints set off from one another. Firm sod until there is an even, flat surface; fill in gaps with soil. Sod has to be watered daily for two weeks, and then it can be rooted.

Utilize your garden tool handles as convenient makeshift rulers. Tools with long handles, such as rakes, shovels or hoes can work as great measuring sticks. Lay the tools down on the floor, then place a measuring tape along the handle. Mark your distances with a permanent marker. Next time you are working in the garden, you will have a large ruler at your fingertips!

When planting perennials, seek out those that are resistant to slugs. Snails and slugs can quickly wreak havoc on a garden. Young plants with smooth and tender leaves are their favorite. There are some perennials that do not appeal to slugs, such as those with leaves that are hairy and tough with a bad taste. Some perennial families that snails and slugs won’t eat include achillea, campanula, and helleborus.

Baking Soda

When powdery mildew appears on your plants, you should not rush out to purchase a costly chemical treatment. Combine baking soda with a small dollop of liquid soap and add it to water. Spray this mix on your plants every week and the mildew should go away. Baking soda will not damage your plants and treats the mildew gently but efficiently.

Bulbs are a great option for people who want to enjoy spring and summer flowers. Not only are bulbs hearty and easy to grow, but they’ll continue to grow as time goes on. Keep in mind that different bulb types bloom differently and at different time periods, so when you choose a bulb plan accordingly, you can have your plant blooms lasting spring into summer.

When the fall season approaches, you must prepare to plant your favorite fall veggies and other edibles. A pumpkin makes a great container, and costs less than a clay pot. Use some Wilt-Pruf to prevent your pumpkin from decomposing and then you can put your plants right inside. After this is completed, it is time to plant!

As you cut your grass, do not trim it too low to the ground. If you leave some of the grass when you mow, the roots grow further into the ground, which makes the grass less prone to drying and other hazards. The shorter the grass, the shallower the roots, which makes the lawn more likely to develop brown patches.

When you’re dealing with a veggie garden, pest control may be difficult. The vegetables are intended to be eaten, thus you should refrain from using harsh pesticides and chemicals. Frequently check your garden for pests. In many cases, you can simply remove the pests from your plants by picking them off.

Choose one plant to be the focal point. Gardens are like art; you need to give the piece (or garden) an initial focal point. Mostly it is a distinctive plant that sets it apart from the neighboring plants and flowers.

Now, you shouldn’t get your hopes up and believe that a few tips are going to turn you into an instant professional gardener. However, these tips are a great starting point if you do plan to grow organically. As you implement these tips and hone your skills, you’ll be a professional green-thumb-holder in no time.